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20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective memory of where we are in this country and how we got to where we currently are. >> i must say, mr. sadler may well be the only person, the only small business owner, former small-business owner in the state who does not think the regulatory and tax burden under this administration has make -- made life harder to create jobs. i will tell you, crisscrossing the state, it does not matter, east texas, west texas, austin, dallas, houston, small-business owners say their life has become much harder with the regulatory uncertainty and burdens. two-thirds of all new jobs come from small-business. >> i am not hearing that from small business. you keep saying that, but i do not hear it. >> in response to the romney video, a obama video service in which he discusses market forces and competition, but also the redistribution of wea
't be an awkward one that sinks their campaign. recall 1992 when president george h.w. bush checks his watch during a debate with then-candidate bill clinton. the gesture gave voters the impression that he was impatient and uninterested. during the 2000 presidential debates, al gore got up in governor george w. bush's grill. look. [laughter] just a classic moment where he was invading his personal space a little, and, boy, did he take some flak. mr. bush gave him a nod and kept talking. in one of the more unusual moments during the vice presidential debates in '92 between republican dan quayle, democrat al gore and the third party running mate of ross perot who was admiral james stockdale, there was this moment. >> admiral stockdale, your opening statement, please, sir. >> who am i? [laughter] why am i here? [laughter] [applause] megyn: he was totally charming and likable but also got a lot of criticism for his performance in that debate, and, you know, his family later came out and said they thought it was unfortunate because they thought it changed his legacy, and he was a very honorable man. in
a more effective version. as we carry on george w. bush's policies. on israel i think some of the romney charges are accurate. the fact is that the president has gratuitously alienated the prime minister of israel on an issue frankly was not relevant, which was settlements. and i don't think, unlike bill clinton, and george w. bush, that this president has the kind of emotional sensitivity that think is required to create some measure of partnership with the israelis even though netanyahu is a difficult guy. on syria, look, let's be clear. we're coming off the two longest wars in american history. the last thing we need is another military adventure that isn't thought through very clearly. on iran, no matter who is president we have got big trouble coming. israelis rightly need to figure out a way to prevent iran from enriching uranium. the question is, whether or not you can do that short of war? and right now, neither barack obama nor mitt romney, nor benjamin netanyahu have answers to that. so --. >> brought us through some very important regions in the middle east and it is such a bi
of approaching. you think back to george w. bush when the whole war on terror started and there was always talk about what a tough battle this was going to be for the rest of our lifetimes basically. and sort of admitting that up fronts, but that the efforts were diligent to make sure that we were going to continue to combat this war on terror. it's almost as if right now 36 days before the election, you don't really want to talk about that side of it, that there might be a reinsurgentence now of equaled, even though osama bin laden is dead. there might still be a resurgence of al-qaeda. >> eric: last night on "60 minutes," there was a fantastic piece on interviewing president karzai from afghanistan and also our general boots on the ground in afghanistan, they have a little bit different take on where al-qaeda is. take a listen. >> al-qaeda has come back. al-qaeda is a resilient organization. but they're not here in large numbers. but al-qaeda doesn't have to be anywhere in large numbers. >> the reason for the nato and american intervention in afghanistan was terrorism. terrorism has not gone
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)